Features, Local, TCPalm

Treasure Coast metal detectorists looking for more than just treasures

Mitch King, a member of the Treasure Coast Archeological Society, says he visits the beach several evenings a week to metal detect on the beach. "We try to go down at low tide because it gives you more access to the lower parts of the beach where people were swimming earlier," said King, adding that he tries to return jewelry, such as rings, to their original owners whenever possible. (SAM WOLFE/TREASURE COAST NEWSPAPERS)
  Mitch King, a member of the Treasure Coast Archeological Society, says he visits the beach several evenings a week to metal detect on the beach. “We try to go down at low tide because it gives you more access to the lower parts of the beach where people were swimming earlier,” said King, adding that he tries to return jewelry, such as rings, to their original owners whenever possible. (SAM WOLFE/TREASURE COAST NEWSPAPERS)

While some facets of the 1715 treasure fleet disaster remain a mystery, one thing is certain: coins and artifacts continue to wash up on Treasure Coast shores.

People who scrounge the beaches with metal detectors hope to recover some of those precious fleet treasures and anything of monetary value.

Members of the Treasure Coast Archeological Society, founded in 1988 by a group of metal detectorists, are driven by a variety of reasons.

Mitch King, the organization’s vice president, has found two silvers rings from the 1715 fleet, but he considers some of his best finds, the rings he’s been able to reunite with people who have lost them.

Full story on TCPalm.com at: http://www.tcpalm.com/franchise/tcpalm-social/treasure-coast-metal-detectorists-looking-for-more-than-just-treasures_62822210